All Metro Games In Order By Release Date – Tech News Today

Metro is a Russian/Ukrainian video game and novel franchise that began with 2005’s Metro 2033 book by Dmitry Glukhovsky. 
So far, we’ve seen a trilogy of games. On top of the original trio, there’s an extra remaster we’re including. The grand total of Metro series games is four. Also, the last game, Metro Exodus, has two expansions.
The series happens in the writer’s fictional world, a post-apocalyptic Russia after a worldwide nuclear war. Gameplay-wise, Metro offers a first-person-shooter survival formula on a mix of linear, non-linear, and semi-open maps.
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The plot follows a series of survivors who found shelter on Moscow’s underground metro system. Each station has a different group, and most groups have unique social structures.
Beneath the surface, these factions are struggling for power, resources, and supplies. The tunnels are a nasty place, full of radiation, mutants, and environmental hazards. Above the surface, the situation is worse. 
You play as a Stalker, someone who scavenges the world for supplies.
As it follows a linear plot, it would be best to play the whole trilogy instead of only the third one. However, if you’re going to pick one, pick Metro Exodus.
Studio 4A Games made an alliance for Glujovsky to create the first game of the series together. They began working on the title in 2006. 
The result, Metro 2033, combines horror, survival, immersive sim, and FPS. It came out with top-of-the-line graphics, performance, and gameplay.
The game follows Artyom, a young Stalker trying to find supplies for a newly-formed faction alliance. You scour both the tunnel and the surface. The alliance’s ultimate goal is defeating a mysterious race of mutant beings, the Dark Ones
It’s not an easy task. Surviving in Metro’s world requires strict resource and equipment management. In particular, these equipment are present on all Metro games:
On top of this, you wear either heavy armor or stealth armor. The game encourages stealth playtime, as bullets are scarce while enemies are tough. 
Even more, military bullets are the only currency in the game. You also have access to more rudimentary bullets made beneath the surface, but these are weaker. All of these means ammo management is vital on Metro 2033.
Lastly, you can tweak the game further for an extra challenge. In particular, you can increase enemy damage and play without a HUD for total immersion (Ranger mode)
4A Games wanted the name “Metro 2034” for the game. However, Glukhovsky thought the title didn’t have anything to do with his newer book of the same title. Interestingly, though, the next novel, Metro 2035, is inspired by Metro: Last Light. That’s a neat feedback loop.
In any case, Last Light happens years after the original title. Without spoiling the first game, your new goal is defeating the Dark Ones on the surface.
You play as Artyom on a long surface quest that uncovers conspiracies and rivalries between the tunnel factions.
Combat-wise, the game makes it feel like Artyom became an expert military operative, rather than a beginner like in the first game. He walks faster, runs faster, reloads weapons more quickly, and resists more damage. 
The second title in the series emphasizes the action and less on stealth and resource management.
Most of your playtime happens on post-apocalyptic Moscu, which means you need a gas mask. You need to change the filters every 30 minutes or so
However, the filter may degrade as you suffer damage. Some hits may crack and break your mask, therefore making the filter less effective and durable. Other filter mechanics increase or decrease your breathing speed or your field of view. 
Additionally, there’re five types of gas masks in the world. However, you need to replace a broken gas mask with another, as there’re no means of repair. 
Then, as I said before, you get the same equipment as the first game. The only change is how the Watch works, as there’s a digital model that’s easier to read.
Other than that, you get the same trading system, improved FPS mechanics, better graphics, and longer playtime
Metro Redux is the remaster of Metro 2033 and Metro: Last Light.
It comes with a graphic overhaul, 4K-res for the Xbox One X and PC, or 1080p-res for PS4, Xbox One, and PC. The frame rate also improved from 24/30 fps to 60fps.
Another critical thing the update took care of are enemy AI, new zones, new secrets, and weapon customizations. 
The remaster also brings two new game modes: “Spartan,” a combat-oriented mode, and “Survival,” a horror-oriented mode.
You can only buy the separate Metro 2033 Redux and Metro: Last Light Redux on Steam. Both games debuted together in a single bundle, but you may also buy them separately. And, sadly, The Redux bundle is not available for PC right now.
Metro: Exodus offers the biggest journey the game has ever since. Most of the game happens above the surface, on non-linear, vast levels offering a sandbox survival experience.
The story follows our hero, Artyom, traveling the surface with his companions to search for a safe place.
Notably, the new game has a strong focus on realism.
For example, it adds a crafting and repair system, and crafting also happens in real life. You crouch to check your bag and craft ammo, weapon mods, filters, and supplies.
Crafting resources are metals, chemicals, and weapon parts. You can make ammo, health packs, filters, grenades, and more. However, what you can craft is scarce, and you can’t make everything.
At the same time, you need to manage your limits. You need to be aware of what you carry and consider your needs before a long journey.
For new equipment, the game introduces a binocular to explore the land. It’s the only means to know what lies ahead, as the game doesn’t share information about the map.
Other elements include the need to recharge or pump some weapons manually, repair gear, and maintain your mask.
And as before, the game thrives on severe resource scarcity. It’s often better to sneak by enemies or let enemies walk past.
Enemies are also unpredictable, and you never know when they may appear or what they might do if you kill or spare their companions. For example, you can take shelter and sleep in a safe house, only to discover bandits surrounding you when you wake up. These are part of the AI-driven events that make the game more immersive.
Similarly, the game reacts to player choice, and you do have options that introduce consequences into the game. Characters remember your choices and actions and respond accordingly.
All of this comes to you with outstanding performance, sound design, OST, character animation, and gameplay.
The Two Colonels is the game’s first DLC. It debuted in 2019. You explore a mysterious tunnel, full of slime and mutants, to save a group of stranded survivors.
It has a different character, though. You play as Khlebnikov on a single linear chapter with new weapons.
You play as Sam, a US marine who was a Moscow embassy guard before the war. After the bombs fall, he makes his way across the tunnels to find a way back home to his family.
The 2020 DLC has a fair amount of new content. It takes about 10 hours to complete Sam’s journey across linear and non-linear scenarios.

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